Home Buying

HOW TO: Buy a home in a seller's market

 

Our area is currently experiencing a seller's market - there are less homes for sale, than interested buyers. This can make it difficult for buyers to break into the housing market; difficult, but not impossible. We have some tips to help you secure a home within your budget - even during a seller's market.

How seller's markets come to exist

The main metric used when evaluating housing markets is home price appreciation.There are several factors which can influence the price of homes in any given area, including:

  • Population growth. Generally, when there's an increase in the number of people moving to a town, demand for housing begins to exceed supply. The basic law of Supply and Demand will tell you that too few homes will lead to an increased sales price. 
  • Job growth. An influx of new companies and jobs can in turn fuel population growth that turns areas into seller's markets. This is a great indicator of economic progress! Unfortunately, it can also present challenges to buyers seeking to relocate to the area. 
  • Housing starts. The term "housing starts" refers to the number of new homes on which builders have started construction in any particular month. Because new construction directly affects supply, a decrease in housing starts can result in a sellers market. 

We are currently experiencing a seller's market. Here's how to tell:

  • Average days on market (DOM). This measurement will tell us the average number of days a home stays on the market before changing hands. In our area, this number has been steadily dropping since January 2017 and as of April 11, 2018, it sits right around 100 days from the day a home goes on the market, to the day the new owners receive the keys. Considering the time it takes to process a contract is about 60-80 days, this number is quite low!
  • Asking vs. final home price. In seller's markets, bidding wars can often erupt among buyers, which means sellers may enjoy a final sales price that's equal to their asking price, or more. So, if a home is listed at $450,000 and sells for $450,000, $460,000, or higher, that's a seller's market. In a strong seller's market, the final sales price is typically at least 10% higher than the asking price.

Buying a house in a seller's market

To compete against other buyers in a seller's market, you need to be prepared. First off, you should meet with a mortgage lender to discuss your finances, and find out what you can afford. You'll need a pre-approval letter before you start looking at homes; when competition is fierce, sellers want to know that the offers they're receiving are backed by actual buying power. 

Once you have a pre-approval, you'll want to hire a Realtor. It is crucial that you are represented during your purchase, especially in a seller's market. The Realtor who has the home listed is contractually bound to represent the seller's best interests not yours. You'll want to find a Realtor that you trust to advocate for you, and get you into the areas you're interested in. Often times Realtors will have knowledge of homes that haven't even hit the market yet - take advantage of that knowledge!

You'll want to discuss with your Realtor your wants, needs, and desired location. When housing supply is low, try to keep an open mind and consider exploring areas slightly outside of your target. Once you've found a home, you and your Realtor will work quickly to submit an offer. Consider adding an Escalation Clause to your contract, which basically states "if sellers receive an offer higher than this one, I am willing to increase my offer to X." You may also want to add a personal letter to the sellers with your contract, sometimes small details like that can really set your offer apart. 

 

Buyer Demand Far Outpaces Inventory...NOW Is The Time To Sell!

Inventory in our area is still very competitive for home sellers, and buyers are entering the market to take advantage of low interest rates. It is truly a great time to enter the real estate market no matter which end of the spectrum you're on!

The price of any item is determined by the supply of that item, as well as the market demand. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) surveys “over 50,000 real estate practitioners about their expectations for home sales, prices and market conditions” for their Realtors Confidence Index.

Their latest edition sheds some light on the relationship between Seller Traffic (supply) and Buyer Traffic (demand).

Buyer Demand

The map on the right was created after asking the question:

“How would you rate buyer traffic in your area?”

The darker the blue, the more buyers are looking for homes in that area. Only 3 states came in with a weak demand level.

 

 

Seller Supply

The Index also asked:

“How would you rate seller traffic in your area?”

As you can see from the map on the left, a good portion of the country has weak seller traffic, meaning there are far fewer homes on the market than what is needed to satisfy the buyers who are out looking for their dream homes.

Bottom Line

Looking at the maps above, it is not hard to see why prices are appreciating in many areas of the country. Until the supply of homes for sale starts to meet the buyer demand, prices will continue to increase. This is great news for homeowners thinking of selling their home. Buyers should not be discouraged; low interest rates allow for affordable options even when inventory is low. 

 

Are you financially ready to buy your first home? Let's find out!

 

 

 

If you're wondering whether you're ready to stop renting and purchase your first home, we are here to help!

With current interest rates still being low, and the cost of rent in our area increasing year over year, now might be the ideal time for you to take the plunge into homeownership. Some might wonder if it makes sense to purchase a house before they are married and have a family, others might think they are too young, and still, others might think their current income would never enable them to qualify for a mortgage. Not to worry, we are here to help you navigate those questions, and any others that may arise. 

We want to share what the typical first-time homebuyer actually looks like based on the National Association of REALTORS most recent Profile of Home Buyers & Sellers. Here are some interesting revelations on the first-time buyer:

Bottom Line

You very well may be ready to purchase your first home, and start building equity! Every situation is unique, and we are always available to answer questions for you.

5 Expert Tips for First Time Home-Buyers

 

April 1st is historically the beginning of real estate's busy season with both buyers and sellers beginning to flood the market. We're sure you've heard time and time again that interest rates are at an-all time low, but will be rising in the very near future. That means that now is the best time to get the home buying process started!

 

 Here are 5 of our best tips to help 1st time home-buyers get started on the road to financial stability:

1. Evaluate your financial health.

First things first, run a credit report on yourself, and anyone else who will be on your mortgage with you. Generally speaking, lenders are looking to see a credit score of at least 600 which indicates that you have a track record of being responsible with your money. While you're looking at your credit report, be sure to take note of any ongoing liabilities and make sure that 1) they are all accurate and 2) check to see if there are any which you could pay off right away. The fewer monthly bills you have (car payment, student loans etc.) the higher your buying power will be!

Next, make an honest budget of your monthly income and expenses; don't forget to factor in the "extra" things like entertainment and dining out! Once you have an accurate assessment of your monthly funds, decide on how much you're comfortable allocating for housing. Keep in mind that the bank will most likely require your monthly housing costs to be at or below 30% of your gross income. 

2. Talk to a lender.

Once you've evaluated your credit and budget, it's time to seek out a knowledgeable lender in your area to determine your borrowing power. We recommend speaking to someone local and accessible as it can make your entire home buying process much less stressful. Your lender will ask for a list of documents in order to complete your pre-approval application, so be prepared to provide things like your most recent pay-stub, bank account information and tax information. The pre-approval process is very quick and relatively simple. Within a day or two you'll know the maximum amount that the bank would be willing to lend to you based on your financial situation. 

Your lender will also be able to discuss their current mortgage programs with you, and help you to decide on the one that will be most viable for your personal situation. Be sure to keep in mind that certain programs will only be available for certain properties, so be sure to discuss your preferred lending program with your realtor. 

3. Find a knowledgeable realtor. 

Speaking of realtors, the next task to tackle is finding a knowledgeable, trusted realtor to assist you. Keep in mind that as the home buyer, you do not pay commission to the realtor, the seller of the home does (there are certain circumstances where that is not the case, but they are very rare). It is of your best interest to have someone on your side negotiating for you and fighting for your best interests. 

We suggest researching testimonials from past clients to get a feel for each realtor's individual style and specialty. Once you've decided on someone you'd work well with, they will ask you to sign a few routine documents, talk to you about your individual needs, preferences and price range, and set to work finding homes to show you. 

Your realtor will be your go-to person during the entire home-buying process. An experienced realtor will be able to field any question you may have and either answer it themselves, or provide you with the resources you need. The process can be stressful, but a good agent will communicate all details and deadlines with you and work to ensure that everything is handled seamlessly. 

4. Decide on your comfort zone.

Now that you know your borrowing power, and you've found a qualified agent to help you, it's time to get down to the details. You'll need to decide first and foremost what you're comfortable spending each month on your home. Share that with your realtor who will help you determine what that means in terms of your down payment and the overall price range of homes you'll be looking at. Remember, just because you're pre-qualified for a certain amount doesn't mean you have to actually spend that much. It's a personal decision, but often times people would rather buy below their maximum and feel more comfortable with their cash flow each month, instead of feeling pinched for cash. 

With your budget in mind, it's time to talk about your preferred locations. Be flexible here; you may start out having your heart set on a certain neighborhood, but see a house across town that meets all of your criteria. Prepare a list of areas that would interest you, and likewise, a list of areas that are out of the question. The more information your realtor has, the more efficient they'll be at finding you something you love!

5. Remain calm and trust the process.  

Once you've found a home, made an offer, and begun the purchase process, your lender will need to turn your pre-approval into a mortgage application. They will set up a meeting with you and give you a list of items that they'll need to get the ball rolling. This may seem intimidating, but hang in there, stay organized, and make sure to ask questions if you have any. Your lender and realtor are working on your behalf, toward a common goal, so be sure to utilize their expertise when needed!

You will, most likely, opt to have your prospective home inspected. This will uncover any abnormalities and give you a solid idea of the home's condition. Next, the bank will require that the home is appraised to ensure that they are making a good investment. The home will be expected to "meet value" meaning it must appraise for at least the amount that you are borrowing. For example, say you're purchasing a $200,000 home and lending $180,000 from the bank, the appraisal must state that the home is valued at $180,000 or above. 

Most importantly, try your best to stay calm during the process. It can be stressful, but keep in mind that 9 times out of 10, any hiccups can be resolved - just keep the lines of communication open. Most purchases take 4-6 weeks from contract to closing day, so just hang in there and focus on the end goal of owning your chosen home!